All, Culture/Life

In defense of thank you notes

Well, folks, the holidays are officially upon us! 😱

Thanksgiving is tomorrow, and before we know it, Christmas and New Year will be here.

People are visiting one another, exchanging gifts, reminiscing about the past.

One sentiment that should be foremost this time of year is gratitude. Perhaps we have forgotten that Thanksgiving isn’t actually about eating gluttonous amounts of food but is a day to thank God and celebrate with loved ones the good things in our lives, which can include turkey and all the trimmings. 😉

Christmas is not about getting material goods but about remembering the gift of God’s Son to our world and in response giving to others.

However, gratitude is something we should practice all year long not just during the holidays.

One concrete way that we can express gratitude is through the increasingly endangered custom of hand-written thank you notes.

Letter-writing, in general, is a practice that I wish would revive.

If you Google “benefits of writing thank you notes,” a whole slew of articles will come up.

Here is my own contribution to the discussion about the value of letter-writing and thank you notes.

1.) Writing thank you notes is polite and considerate. Nowadays, it sometimes seems like what was once known as “common courtesy” is not so common any more. I don’t need to list the ways in which society today regularly divides and degrades people. Any little act of courtesy and thoughtfulness, like a thank you note or a “thinking of you” card, can be a light in the darkness.

2.) Thank you notes or hand-written cards and letters are more personal than typed emails or texts. A person’s hand-writing is unique. When you write something to someone, you are really giving a part of yourself to that person.

A text message or email could be typed by anyone. It all looks the same. It’s kind of ironic really. Out culture is constantly pushing individualism, yet our proliferation of and dependence on technology as the primary mode of communicating is obliterating one of the most individual things about a person, namely, his or her hand-writing, especially cursive.

One can also find several articles about the benefits of hand-writing through a simple Google search, just FYI.

This being said, if you want to thank someone immediately for a mailed present, etc., or to let someone know you received a gift, sending an email or text is a nice idea. You can always send a thank you note later.

3.) Writing a thank you note or other type of letter shows you truly care. Whether you’re thanking someone for a gift or a favor or for hosting you at his or her house for the weekend, it’s likely that person expended time, energy, and thought on your behalf.

The least we could do then is sacrifice a bit of our own time and energy to write a thank you note.

4.) Receiving mail is just plain fun! Don’t you like to receive a letter in the mail? Aren’t you grateful when someone takes the time to thank you or check in on you through good old-fashioned snail mail?Well then, you are not alone in this feeling. Share the joy with another person!

5.) Letters and notes can be a keepsake of the past. If you’re having a gloomy day, you can pull out an old note or letter and be rejuvenated by someone’s kind words.

Or think about how much information and insight we glean about history from reading the letters of people in various time periods.

A hundred years from now, it’ll be slim pickings for our descendants when it comes to letters informing them of our daily lives.

Instead, they’ll have to find old external hard drives and flash drives to read emails? That seems pretty sad.

In whatever form it takes, an in-person thank you, a phone call (which is also a decreasing practice due to texting), a text or email, gratitude is a virtue we all need to cultivate consciously. But making that extra effort to write a thank you note, undoubtedly, is a worthwhile endeavor.

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